Stop Smoking Help Center

WHY STOP USING TOBACCO PRODUCTS?

smoking

Tobacco use leads to disease and disability.

  • Smoking causes cancer, heart disease, stroke, lung diseases (including emphysema, bronchitis, and chronic airway obstruction), and diabetes.1
  • For every person who dies from a smoking-related disease, about 30 more people suffer with at least one serious illness from smoking.1
  • More than 16 million Americans suffer from a disease caused by smoking.1smoking3

Tobacco use is the leading preventable cause of death. Consider this:

  • Worldwide, tobacco use causes more than 5 million deaths per year, and current trends show that tobacco use will cause more than 8 million deaths annually by 2030.2
  • Cigarette smoking is responsible for more than 480,000 deaths per year in the United States, including an estimated 41,000 deaths resulting from secondhand smoke exposure.1 This is about one in five deaths annually, or 1,300 deaths every day.1
  • On average, smokers die 10 years earlier than nonsmokers.3
  • If smoking persists at the current rate among youth in this country, 5.6 million of today’s Americans younger than 18 years of age are projected to die prematurely from a smoking-related illness. This represents about one in every 13 Americans aged 17 years or younger who are alive today.1

*All of the above references are provided at the bottom of this page.


Centers for Disease Control Methods to Quit Smoking:
http://www.cdc.gov/tobacco/data_statistics/fact_sheets/cessation/quitting/index.htm
For further details on the references provided below, please refer to this above website.


The majority of cigarette smokers quit without using evidence-based treatments. However,
THE FOLLOWING TREATMENTS ARE PROVEN TO BE EFFECTIVE FOR SMOKERS WHO WANT HELP TO QUIT:

  • Brief clinical interventions (i.e., when a doctor takes 10 minutes or less to deliver advice and assistance about quitting)2
  • Individual, group, or telephone counseling2
  • Behavioral therapies (e.g., training in problem solving)2
  • Treatments with more person-to-person contact and intensity (e.g., more or longer counseling sessions)2
  • Programs to deliver treatments using mobile phones12

 

MEDICATIONS for quitting that have been found to be effective include the following:

  • Nicotine replacement products2smoking4
    • Over-the-counter (nicotine patch [which is also available by prescription], gum, lozenge)
    • Prescription (nicotine patch, inhaler, nasal spray)
  • Prescription non-nicotine medications: bupropion SR (Zyban®)2, varenicline tartrate (Chantix®).2,13

Counseling and medication are both effective for treating tobacco dependence, and using them together is more effective than using either one alone.2

 

C.D.C. References

  1. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences of Smoking—50 Years of Progress: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health, 2014 [accessed 2014 Apr 24].
  2. World Health Organization. WHO Report on the Global Tobacco Epidemic, 2011. Geneva: World Health Organization, 2011 [accessed 2014 Apr 24].
  3. Jha P, Ramasundarahettige C, Landsman V, Rostron B, Thun M, Anderson RN, McAfee T, Peto R. 21st Century Hazards of Smoking and Benefits of Cessation in the United States. New England Journal of Medicine 2013;368:341–50 [accessed 2014 Apr 24].